Close Attractions

The Hirsel

The Hirsel is a Category A Listed stately home near Coldstream in the Scottish Borders. It has been a seat of the Earls of Home since 1611, and the principal seat following the destruction of Hume Castle during the mid-17th century.


Nisbet House

Nisbet House is a 17th-century mansion in the Scottish Borders. It is located on the north side of the Blackadder Water, 2.5 kilometres south of Duns, in the Merse, a low-lying part of the former county of Berwickshire.


Kimmerghame House

Kimmerghame House is a 19th-century mansion in the Scottish Borders, located 4 kilometres south-east of Duns by the Blackadder Water. It is the seat of the Swintons of Kimmerghame, a branch of the Lowland Clan Swinton.


Etal Castle - Northumberland

In 1341, Robert Manners was granted a licence to fortify his home to protect it against the threat of attack from Scottish raiders. In 1513, when an army of 30,000 Scots led by James IV invaded England, Etal Castle fell, but these invaders were then defeated in the bloody battle that ensued on Flodden Hill. An award-winning exhibition tells the story of the Battle of Flodden and of the border warfare that existed here before the union of the English and Scottish crowns in 1603.


Paxton House

Built for a dashing young Scottish laird, Patrick Home of Billie, in 1758 on a ridge overlooking the majestic River Tweed, Paxton House is one of the finest 18th century Palladian country houses in Britain. On view are 12 period rooms, many boasting interiors by Robert Adam and the finest collections of furniture by Thomas Chippendale including the unique star-backed chairs in the lady's bedroom. There are also exquisite Regency period Scottish furniture, designed by William Trotter of Edinburgh. The House was extended in 1811 by George Home, 16th Laird of Wedderburn, to include the largest purpose built picture gallery in a Scottish Country House, in which are now housed over 70 paintings from the National Galleries of Scotland.


Paxton House

Built for a dashing young Scottish laird, Patrick Home of Billie, in 1758 on a ridge overlooking the majestic River Tweed, Paxton House is one of the finest 18th century Palladian country houses in Britain. On view are 12 period rooms, many boasting interiors by Robert Adam and the finest collections of furniture by Thomas Chippendale including the unique star-backed chairs in the lady's bedroom. There are also exquisite Regency period Scottish furniture, designed by William Trotter of Edinburgh. The House was extended in 1811 by George Home, 16th Laird of Wedderburn, to include the largest purpose built picture gallery in a Scottish Country House, in which are now housed over 70 paintings from the National Galleries of Scotland.